Scott Klinger's Encyclop(s)edia

MESSAGE ARCHIVE THEME LINKS
I am an artist in Los Angeles. All work is original content. Please credit if reposting. All rights reserved.
  • The Four Butterflies of the Apocalypse, 2014, 32” x 40”, Fuji Crystal Archive C-print

    The Four Butterflies of the Apocalypse, 2014, 32” x 40”, Fuji Crystal Archive C-print

  • Scott Klinger, Cave Painting 3, 72” x 48”, Spray Paint on Duvateen, 2012

    Scott Klinger, Cave Painting 3, 72” x 48”, Spray Paint on Duvateen, 2012

  • Scott Klinger, Cave Painting 2, 72” x 48”, Spray Paint on Duvateen

    Scott Klinger, Cave Painting 2, 72” x 48”, Spray Paint on Duvateen

  • Scott Klinger, Finite (Polyphemus’ Cave), Installation View, 2012

    Scott Klinger, Finite (Polyphemus’ Cave), Installation View, 2012

  • Baseball bat: Object, Symbol. Used as the armature for two stalagmites in Polyphemus’ Cave. Signifies the age in life in which one realizes that the fantasies of youth are no longer feasible, or tenable. Scott observes that in adults a baseball bat is more often than not regarded as a weapon, however to most 5-12 year olds a baseball bat is simply regarded as a baseball bat for use in the sport of baseball.  The analogy starts getting messy during the teens. Baseball is the most popular sport in Tucson, Arizona, which is where Scott grew up. As such he played baseball regularly as a child up through to high school. Scott’s high school baseball team is particularly famous for producing 5 major league baseball players from that single team. Scott was not one of them. During college at UCLA, Scott played in the semi-professional Pacific Coast Baseball League, where his career lasted 5 games, two of which ended in trips to the emergency room.


  • Scott Klinger,Finite (Polyphemus’ Cave),Installation View

    Scott Klinger,Finite (Polyphemus’ Cave),Installation View

  • Gold: Chemical Element, Color of spray paint used extensively by Scott Klinger. Traditionally considered attractive. Most common basis of monetary policies and currency throughout human existence. The perceived value of gold represents one of the most distinct differences between man and animal. The artist read somewhere that a total of over 165,000 tonnes have been mined throughout human history. Half of which has been used to make jewelry. Scott Klinger has two gold teeth, his first molars on both sides, symmetrically spaced on his bottom jaw. He views them as an emergency savings plan. The primary goal of alchemy was the transmutation of common metals into gold. Gold has become a common aesthetic theme in Scott’s work over the past few years. Of course, there are the heavy symbolic associations that come loaded with the use of gold, and Scott has an appreciation for these symbolic meanings but there is something more to it than that for explaining why Scott has begun to predominantly use the color in his work. Scott can’t quite articulate what exactly it is though. It is something both more meaningful than all of that and yet more abstract and personal. A. Maybe it began when the artist got his first gold teeth? B. Maybe it is some sort of pathetic compensation for his perceived relative worth existing as an artist in society at large? C. Perhaps the usage is recalling latent childhood Indiana Jones fantasies and the desire to create and possess objects of rare and significant worth? D. All of the above are valid perceptions for the viewer to believe.


  • Scott Klinger, Tlazolteotl’s Flower, 72” x 24” x 24”, 2012

    Scott Klinger, Tlazolteotl’s Flower, 72” x 24” x 24”, 2012

  • Cocoon: Pupal casing made by moths, site of transformation. If one wanted, one could make ill-advised metaphor for grad school. 12 moth cocoons were placed in a glass terrarium in Polyphemus’ Cave. There is no significance to the number twelve. The cocoons were expensive and it seemed a reasonable number. Throughout the duration of Scott Klinger’s thesis exhibition the moths hatched on their own accord and schedule yet miraculously coinciding at regular intervals throughout the duration of the show. This was hoped for and intended for, but in no way controlled. One female moth hatched at approximately 6:15 pm, 15 minutes into the opening of the exhibition. She promptly found a stick and climbed to the top of it to unfold her wings. Several humans were there to witness it and can verify this although Scott does not have photo documentation. It was viewed by the artist as evidence of the existence of magic in a metaphorical understanding of the term.


  • Cave Painting 1, Spray Paint on Velour, 4’ x 6’, 2012

    Cave Painting 1, Spray Paint on Velour, 4’ x 6’, 2012

  • Ideogram: Concept, a graphic symbol that represents an idea. Chinese characters are ideograms as are Maya hieroglyphs. A posteriori knowledge traditionally necessitates the understanding of ideograms. The concept of a priori vs. a posteriori knowledge in regards to ideograms is explored in conjunction with Abstraction in the artist’s Cave Paintings. The artist first became interested in the concept in light of a project initiated by the Department of Energy in which a team of academics were enlisted to come up with a visual language system to warn future civilizations of the presence and danger of radioactive material for the next 10 millenniums. The concept was further explored when the artist became interested in Maya glyphs and culture. The artist envisions the Cave Paintings as a tête-à-tête’ between Ideograms and Abstraction. See ABSTRACTION


  • Scott Klinger, Finite (Polyphemus’ Cave), Installation view

    Scott Klinger, Finite (Polyphemus’ Cave), Installation view

  • Alchemy:  A historical quasi-scientific concept. Out-moded philosophy.  Referred to by the artist in a bastardized usage to describe his artistic practice as a way of transforming disparate materials into objects of greater worth than the sum of their materials. Related to the traditional alchemical goal of transmutation. Of particular note is the practice of using Gold spray-paint in the making of his Cave Paintings, as well as prominent use on the various stalagmite and stalactites in Polyphemus’ Cave which was donepartially in an attempt to convince his wife of the worth and merit of his artistic practice.

    “Alchemy depicted the cave as a form of the alchemical vas, and religious lore has seen the cave as a space of conversion and the climax of a spiritual quest. “(ARAS, 112)


13